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Spotlight 2015: Health IT’s Most Influential Women

blogimage_(1)Each year individuals emerge at the forefront of Health IT as pioneers and inventors of technological solutions for today’s global health initiatives. Highlighting the accomplishments of women in this field, Fierce Healthcare has released its annual list of 10 influential women in Health IT in 2015. This group of inspiring, CEOs, Founders, and VPs is a testament to the accomplishments of the entire Health IT community and the individuals who strive to improve upon the future of our healthcare. Let’s take a deeper look into some of this year’s Fierce Healthcare Influential Women of Health IT and the impact of their contributions:

Aurelia Boyer, Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer at New York- Presbyterian Hospital System

Aurelia is a graduate of Wayne State University and the University of Michigan where she received her BSN and MBA. As the CIO of New York- Presbyterian, Aurelia oversees an IT budget of over $130 million and an IT team comprised of approximately 400 staff members. In an InformationWeek CIO Profile, Boyer labeled her top initiatives for New York- Presbyterian, highlighting the hospitals efforts to use data analytics and predictive modeling capabilities to drive cost and quality effectiveness, use technology to improve patient access to services, and to drive interconnectivity across all facets of care in order to improve care coordination. Most recently, New York- Presbyterians was ranked among US News’ Best Hospitals, claiming a top-10 spot on the Honor Roll for the 15th year in a row and earning the top spot for hospitals within New York state specifically.

Elizabeth Holmes, Founder and CEO, Theranos

According to Forbes Magazine, Elizabeth Holmes is the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire, at 31. After leaving Stanford University during her Sophomore year, Elizabeth sought out to develop an easier, more cost-effective solution to blood testing. Since then Holmes and her team have developed numerous tests centered around simple, painless finger pricks that allow for a multitude of tests to be conducted at a percentage of the price of commercial labs. Most recently, Elizabeth and her company received FDA clearance for a herpes test and the approval for her tests to be used in non-Theranos or CLIA-certified locations.

Deven McGraw, Deputy Director for Health Information Privacy at the Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights

Recently appointed to her current position as Deputy Director for Health Information Privacy at the Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights, Deven McGraw is set to spearhead “enforcement, and outreach efforts on the HIPAA Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules; as well as lead OCR’s work on Presidential and Departmental priorities on health privacy and security” according to the HHS Office of Civil Rights’ announcement of her appointment in June 2015. With experience in both the private sector and alongside non-profit organizations, McGraw is well positioned to continue her pioneering efforts as a leader for the OCR and the future of our nation’s healthcare infrastructure.

While these are only a few among the list of this year’s ten Fierce Healthcare Influential Women of Health IT, the full list can be found here.  Thank you to these women and the countless other individuals striving to make an impact in today’s Health IT world through acts of leadership and the development of patient-centered, technological solutions.

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About Mark Grenga

As an account executive at Ambra Health, Mark Grenga is focused on delivering cloud-based, medical image management solutions to leading practices that reflect upon the patient-centric and value-based care models driving healthcare innovation today. Mark received a BA in history from the University of Virginia and enjoys volunteering with the Big Brothers and Big Sisters in New York.

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